COI
Our COI has been up and running for a few months now and we hope that you have found it a useful tool. We now have the average COI for the whole of 2012, the figure being 2.94% just a small amount above the 2.5% or lower that we aim for on a 5 generation pedigree. During the last 12 years the inbreeding coefficient on those 5 generations has steadily come down, three slight rises did occur but since 2009 there has been a decrease each year, we firmly believe that education and information is the way to proceed in our endeavours to keep our breed in a healthy state. We think we can all give ourselves a pat on the back for the improvements that have already been made, and that when you can see there IS actually progress being made then it helps us be more determined to keep on that track. We cannot change what has happened in the past but we can determine what happens in the future and it seems that we are going in the right direction.

About a year ago after reading the Population Analysis 2012 by Dr Sarah Blott, Head of Quantitative Genetics at The Animal Health Trust, we wrote to her. BCX was in the progress of doing the COI calculations and we wanted her input. We were very pleased when she replied. The first thing in her reply was, and I quote: I agree that education and information will be more effective than rules and regulations. I had a quick look at your site, it is excellent. Inbreeding and inbreeding coefficients are difficult concepts to understand and the more we can do to publicize them and educate people the better. Bearded Collies are interesting because a significant part in the increase in inbreeding is people mating related dogs. In other words, people are not searching very far to find less-related mates. We concluded from our analysis that inbreeding rates could be lower, as the background relationships were less than the current inbreeding.

DEVELOPMENT
More dogs are imported to the UK, 9 and 12 during 2011 and 2012, compared to 1 or 2 in the years before. A few breeders have gone abroad to do matings and a couple of overseas dogs have been on loan in the UK and used at stud.

As you can see in the table below, there has been a significant change in the way people breed.

COI
0-2,5
2,6-6,2
6,3-12,5
>12,5
2000
21,9%
22,5%
34,9%
20,7%
2002
24,4%
26,7%
34,3%
14,7%
2004
26,9%
35,0%
28,8%
9,3%
2006
29,1%
29,0%
28,3%
13,6%
2008
42,9%
27,5%
23,1%
6,6%
2010
51,4%
19,2%
22,7%
6,7%
2012
61,6%
34,1%
3,0%
1,3%
2014
60,9%
21,9%
12,5%
4,7%

Finally we would like to quote Dr Mike Tempest:
The first solution I would propose is urgently needed, and is that Mate Select is amended so that all the COIs it gives are calculated over five generations. At the moment the COIs for individual dogs are calculated over different numbers of complete close-up generations, combined with an interminable number of incomplete distant generations. It is not valid to compare individual dogs’ COIs calculated over different numbers of generations, nor is it valid to calculate a breed average COI from these different generation individual COIs.
Standardising everything to a five-gen COI would also mean that when a common ancestor’s COI has to be multiplied in, it would also be a five-gen COI that was used, and it would also avoid the risk of double counting far off ancestors. Publishing five-gen COIs on Mate Select would also satisfy the DAC proposal. Without this standardisation the KC will get breeders ‘hung out to dry’ on irrelevant figures calculated over distant generations.

Please read the whole article, found here and also his article on Genetic diversity

REPORT 2014

There were 64 litters registered during 2014 with a total of 358 puppies, as we have said previously this is the lowest figure for a very long time, its equates to a 34% drop, there are for sure many reasons this may have happened and it will be interesting to see if this worrying trend will continue.

Inbreeding Coefficient for 2014 can now also be summed up as we have all the necessary information from the last of the Breed Record Supplement for 2014. It is now 2.95 %, still low and not much different from last years figure of 2.98 %. The ideal, according to the genetic experts would be 2.5 % or lower.
The highest COI during 2014 is 23.7 %! extremely high when you consider the ideal of 2.5% when calculated on the 5 generation pedigree, however it is pleasing to see that eleven litters have a COI of 0%. and 39 litters were under the desirable 2.5% ..... 11 litters were above 6.25 % which most geneticists agree is a line that should not be crossed.

Bringing in dogs from abroad and going outside of the UK to mate does seem to be having a positive effect on inbreeding coefficients. For instance, the COI for dogs born from 2000 to 2014, with 2 British parents, produced an average of 5.8 % but for dogs born from one or two parents with an overseas pedigree the total is 3.0 %.